Custom Tractor Art - MaddKStudio.com
classic-tractor-news-logo

We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Classic Tractors.

Discover the Most Popular Old Ford Tractors

By Tom Seest

At ClassicTractorNews, we help classic tractor lovers keep up with the latest news for classic and vintage tractors.

An easy way to identify an old Ford tractor is by checking its serial number on the engine block, which should be located on the upper/front/left side behind the oil filter and begin and end with either stars or diamonds, depending on its age and model.

Which Old Ford Tractors Are Most Popular?

Which Old Ford Tractors Are Most Popular?

What Models of Old Ford Tractors Exist?

Ford introduced the 9N tractor as part of its N Series line in 1940, and it quickly became one of the best-selling individual tractors ever produced. It was designed to address issues associated with Fordson models, such as flipping over three-point hitches or Ferguson system plows and also improving performance when pulling heavier implements – so much so that both US Navy and RAF carriers were using Moto Tugs on aircraft carriers to tow planes behind these tractors!
Soon after production began on model N, some design changes were implemented that transformed it into an 8N. For instance, a push button starter was added on the left side of the dash near the ammeter, and the transmission oil level dipstick was moved under the hood; the clutch pedal linkage changed from bolted pedal linkage to lever arm linkage for improved reliability; around serial number 27940 rear “smooth axles” were upgraded with stronger two-piece riveted axle hubs while double ribbed fenders underwent at least two reductions of rivets from double ribbed to single ribbed fenders as a result.
The engine in the 8N was also updated, boasting a larger, better-flowing cylinder head. Furthermore, its carburetor was revised for greater fuel economy while it received an increase in horsepower rating – all this meant more power and performance while still remaining economically friendly.

What Models of Old Ford Tractors Exist?

What Models of Old Ford Tractors Exist?

What Engines Powered Old Ford Tractors?

Ford realized in 1942, as wartime material shortages and price controls led to material rationing that any tractors built must include electric starters and rubber tires if production were to continue at all. These 2N models still very closely resembled their 9N counterparts, although with fewer restrictions. Now, due to rare cast aluminum hoods on these tractors often being polished rather than painted to show their beauty, many are often polished rather than painted to display them proudly.
The initial one of these tractors had features not typically seen at that time, such as a pressurized radiator and sealed beam headlights. Around this time was when Select-O-Speed transmission first made its debut; unfortunately it quickly gained a negative reputation because it wasn’t suitable for use on tractors.
Other changes made to these tractors included installing a larger cooling fan and, later, an improved clutch pedal linkage. The ignition key was relocated from under the hood to the steering column; dash and shifter base were converted from cast iron to plastic; steering wheels switched from hard rubber outside with three exposed steel spokes in the center to hard rubber outside with three exposed steel spokes in the center; serial numbers started with 9N in 1939 to N in 1942 and 8N by 1947 and were stamped or painted onto left side of engine blocks near exhaust/intake ports on # 1 cylinder exhaust/intake ports on engine blocks in front of number one cylinder exhaust/intake ports on engine blocks or engine blocks in front of number one cylinder exhaust/intake ports of number one cylinder’s exhaust/intake ports of number one cylinder exhaust/intake ports (and stamped/painted to left side engine blocks left side in front of number one cylinder’s exhaust/intake ports of exhaust/intake ports on left side of left side engine block, stamped/painted onto engine block in front of number one cylinder’s exhaust/intake ports for easier identification.) This serial numbering scheme began around 1940 with 9N followed by N to N by 1947 until finally, the 8N series began for 1947 production tractors. These serial numbers can be found stamped/painted onto the left engine block in front of the exhaust/intake ports of the number one cylinder in front of this tractor).

What Engines Powered Old Ford Tractors?

What Engines Powered Old Ford Tractors?

What Transmissions Did Old Ford Tractors Use?

Though many modern tractors feature advanced electronic technology for controlling and operating them, old Fords remain straightforward and straightforward in operation. Their basic hydraulic system enables attachments like post hole diggers, mower blades, scoops, and even cement mixers to be added onto these tractors easily.
Some older Ford tractors can be traced back to their manufacturing date using casting codes found on various parts. These casting codes typically consist of letters (A=January, B=February, etc), followed by two numbers for days within that month, and then one final number representing the year. Aluminum radiator pump housings often bear date codes in front of their drain plug on the bottom; for maximum clarity, look at different angles or light sources when viewing these.
Late in 1952, the old 9N was replaced with the more advanced NAA model, and in 1953, the NAA Jubilee model, boasting a larger 134 cubic inch overhead valve engine, live hydraulics, redesigned front sheet metal, strengthened clutch ring gears for increased strength and life, plus bypassing automatic controls to stay at one constant depth regardless of soil conditions. At that same time, an original Ferguson System draft control setting was altered into a Position Control setting, enabling one implement to remain at a constant depth no matter the soil conditions.

What Transmissions Did Old Ford Tractors Use?

What Transmissions Did Old Ford Tractors Use?

How Does the Clutch on Old Ford Tractors Work?

Ford introduced their “Hundred” series tractors in the early nineteen hundreds. These powerful and customizable machines offered several clutch and PTO options so farmers could select one suitable to their task at hand. Unfortunately, however, due to all this extra horsepower, the tractor became more expensive to own and repair.
The 9N was first produced in 1939, followed by its twin 2N in 1942, and then an 8N made especially to celebrate Ford’s 50th anniversary – both models having a similar appearance to the original 9Ns and 2Ns but with some key modifications such as an overhead valve engine design that increased horsepower output; an aluminum cast hood painted gray by the factory was rarer yet, prompting current owners to polish them until their shine.
These tractors used an odd font for their serial numbers, hand-stamped onto cast iron engine and transmission housings by hand-stamping. As these numbers could only be read with proper reading glasses, they could be difficult to read at times. Each engine had a cast-in date code starting with A (for January), followed by two numbers to indicate which day of each month it occurred on (and finally, two numbers that indicated which year it took place in).

How Does the Clutch on Old Ford Tractors Work?

How Does the Clutch on Old Ford Tractors Work?

How Can Old Ford Tractors Leverage Hydraulics?

Old Ford tractors had few safety features to prevent rearing up and tipping over during plowing, leaving the small size particularly susceptible. Although attempts were made to reduce this tendency, no definitive solution could be found until many owners modified their tractors with traction bars and other safety devices.
Ford-Ferguson tractors were originally sold through Ferguson-Sherman Inc, however after 1941 most production was transferred over to Ford. Due to World War Two rationing of rubber and other materials some special “war time” 2N models with steel wheels and magneto ignitions instead of batteries were produced as war time models.
In 1947, tractors received an upgrade known as the 8N. The gas tank was moved from behind the engine to in front of the tractor with a larger hood for increased visibility and draft capability. Furthermore, a new transmission with helical cut gears and a four-speed transmission was installed; additionally, a position control lever on 3-point lifts provided draft and positioning operation.
The hydraulic dip-stick was replaced with a plug on the side inspection cover, and oil levels must be measured by unbolting, unscrewing the stick, and measuring fluid levels. To maximize performance on these tractors, combined hydraulic/transmission fluid that has a thinner consistency than 80 or 90 weight motor oil is recommended; this allows it to flow more freely past seals without needing warm up time before use in winter conditions.

How Can Old Ford Tractors Leverage Hydraulics?

How Can Old Ford Tractors Leverage Hydraulics?

Uncovering the Paint Secrets of Old Ford Tractors?

Purists often complain when 9Ns are painted green or yellow, although it doesn’t look as nice. However, any paint will protect the metal beneath, so there’s little point in trying to replicate its original colors if you plan to strip it anyway; modern paint cannot match exactly due to different light conditions, camera settings, and other variables.
Early 9Ns featured more chrome than later models, including chrome radiator caps, gauge bezels, and choke knobs, as well as chrome hood hinges and cast aluminum hoods that many owners choose to polish instead of repaint.
Ford realized by 1942 that, to keep producing tractors during World War II, materials such as rubber tires must be restricted for war use; double-ribbed rear fenders would also need to be shrunk down significantly in size.
Ford introduced a series of tractors after World War II that ended with “1,” where each number indicated power configuration and transmission/hitch/PTO options. Row crop tractors of the “6001” series, offset tractors in the “701” series, and utility configurations comprising the “6000” series were all introduced and became part of our lives today. This marked the birth of today’s thousands of series tractors!

Uncovering the Paint Secrets of Old Ford Tractors?

Uncovering the Paint Secrets of Old Ford Tractors?

Please share this post with your friends, family, or business associates who may like old classic or vintage tractors.