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An Overview of Porsche and Tractors

By Tom Seest

Has Porsche Ever Produced Tractors?

At ClassicTractorNews, we help classic tractor lovers keep up with the latest news for classic and vintage tractors.

Porsche is widely associated with high-performance German sports cars; however, the company also created and produced tractors.
Dr Ferdinand Porsche began designing people’s tractors simultaneously with his groundbreaking Volkswagen Beetle design. Like its iconic vehicle counterpart, Dr Ferdinand’s tractor would outlive its harsh designer and become an enduring symbol.

Has Porsche Ever Produced Tractors?

Has Porsche Ever Produced Tractors?

What Powers Old Porsche Tractors?

Dr. Ferdinand Porsche was best known for designing automobiles like the Volkswagen Beetle and military vehicles known as Kubelwagen and Schwimwagen; but he also dabbled in tractor design. Starting his eponymous engineering and design firm in 1931, it was disrupted by economic depression and World War II production priorities: many German factories produced military equipment instead of tractors during that conflict – meaning his tractor design work ceased for some time afterward. After returning home after 1945 however, Porsche resumed his tractor design work again, signing licensing deals with Allgaier in Germany and Hofherr Schrantz in Austria so as to produce them under their own brands.
These companies produced approximately 125,000 Porsche-branded tractors between 1965 and 1971. Most of these models were sold across Europe where their 15 hp engines proved particularly popular among farmers; only around 1,000 units were ever sold in America due to price competitiveness issues with American-built equipment; therefore Porsche set up an American subsidiary in Easton, Pennsylvania in order to sell them there.
Porsche engineers designed their tractors with simplicity and reliability in mind. The air-cooled engine used individual cylinders that could easily be removed for maintenance. Furthermore, fluid couplings were installed between the engine and transmission to facilitate swift changes between gears.
Tractors were manufactured in three models, from twin to four-cylinder engines. The Junior was the least costly option while Standard and Super versions featured more powerful engines with better lifting capacities.
The Porsche tractor is one of the best-known German tractors and was named after its designer, Dr. Ferdinand Porsche. These reliable machines could handle nearly any task including pulling heavy loads. Their operating interface was straightforward while their air-cooled engines featured low power-to-weight ratios for optimal performance.
Those considering buying a Porsche tractor should know that these models are extremely scarce – only a handful ever make it through auction, meaning if you manage to find one there, expect to pay top dollar!

What Powers Old Porsche Tractors?

What Powers Old Porsche Tractors?

How Does a Porsche Tractor’s Transmission Work?

Porsche was known primarily as an engineering and automotive company, yet they occasionally dabbled in tractor design as well. Between the 1930s and 1940s, they worked on various designs both gas-powered and diesel-powered; unfortunately, WWII forced companies to use all available resources towards producing war efforts, forcing Porsche’s designs into disuse.
Once the war had concluded, Porsche was able to revive their tractor designs. Working alongside OM works of Brescia Italy (which had produced trucks for Germany’s war effort and were highly-respected truck makers) they created the Type 113 tractor: featuring an air-cooled two-cylinder diesel engine producing 25bhp via fluid coupling sending power back through a fluid coupling to its dual range manual transmission.
At the time, it was revolutionary that this tractor featured an advanced transmission system utilizing hydraulic technology with no clutches required for shifting gears. This greatly reduced wear and tear on transmission components while other features like its spring front axle and hydraulically controlled brakes made it extremely maneuverable.
Porsche’s tractor design was so cutting-edge at the time, that many farmers and consumers flocked to it. Over 125,000 units were manufactured between 1956 and 1963 despite higher prices and competition from local competitors; unfortunately, these constraints prevented Porsche from becoming a dominant force in their respective fields.
Now owned and displayed at various rallies and concourse exhibitions by enthusiasts, these tractors are also featured at various rallies and concourse shows. A Porsche-Diesel Tractor Register provides protection and technical guidance to owners. Furthermore, this organization serves as an invaluable source for those curious about Porsche’s history or tractor designs.

How Does a Porsche Tractor's Transmission Work?

How Does a Porsche Tractor’s Transmission Work?

Unlock the Power of Old Porsche Tractors: Hydraulics?

Porsche originally created his tractor designs using fluid clutches and air-cooled engines; however, by the time they were ready for production World War II had already consumed most of Germany’s industry and postwar Allied occupation government policies encouraged companies to produce agricultural products so as to get back on their feet; many firms picked up Porsche’s tractor ideas and produced them without his involvement as he was still serving his prison sentence for war crimes.
Allgaier-Porsche’s lineup of tractors offered in an assortment of sizes with one to four cylinders was made up of Junior single-cylinder models, Standard twin-cylinder engines, and the Super’s three-cylinder motor – each specifically tailored to a different type of agriculture.
For instance, vineyard tractors were developed with narrow treads to handle steeper terrain, while coffee plantation models equipped with petrol engines were manufactured until 1963.
Allgaier and Porsche collaborated closely to create an innovative yet profitable tractor range, starting with the A 133 produced in 1952 as an initial step. It featured an integrated single head covering both cylinders with major components shared between Allgaier’s twin-cylinder AP 17 engine.
One major advancement was a hydraulic coupling between the engine and transmission, which eliminated the need for clutches while enabling operators to shift gears while running the engine. This innovation became the standard on Porsche-designed tractors.
Between 1956 and 1963, over 125,000 Porsche-Diesel tractors were produced. These tractors quickly earned acclaim for their impeccable engineering and build quality; many are still used today by farmers while also treasured in classic tractor circles and wider Porsche collections. If you’re interested in adding one to your collection there are a number of solid examples under $15,000; pre-purchase inspection from an expert is advisable but these machines are easy enough for the novice collector to maintain themselves.

Unlock the Power of Old Porsche Tractors: Hydraulics?

Unlock the Power of Old Porsche Tractors: Hydraulics?

Old Porsche Tractors: How Safe Are They?

When one thinks of Porsche, one’s mind often wanders straight to a sleek 911 or one of its other racecars. However, Porsche began life making agricultural equipment long before venturing into sports cars; indeed they continue to produce them today! Here is a peek at some older models.
Dr. Ferdinand Porsche began designing tractor prototypes during the 1930s alongside the development of the Volkswagen Beetle. Early prototypes resembled VW models in many respects; however, by the time these designs were ready for production WWII had started and Porsche’s plans had to be put on pause; after WWII was over, Germany’s occupation government ordered many companies to refocus on agricultural machinery production; Porsche was one of them.
Mannesmann AG produced tractors based on Porsche’s engine design, sold under the names Allgaier Porsche and Hofherr Schrantz Porsche. When Allgaier decided to stop producing tractors in 1956, Mannesmann purchased both rights and the factory. Mannesmann rebuilt an old Zeppelin factory west of Friedrichshafen-Manzell to produce Porsche tractors until 1963; more than 125,000 of these tractors were produced during this seven-year production run.
One of Porsche’s most renowned tractor models was the Junior 108. As the smallest of four tractor models produced, this tractor featured an 822cc single-cylinder diesel engine. A 1961 version recently hit Bonhams auction block where it is expected to fetch between $45,000-$65,000.
These rare tractors continue to be widely used for agriculture worldwide and can be seen at events such as ag shows, parades, and concourse exhibitions. The Porsche-Diesel Register exists as an organization to promote and preserve these rare machines while helping owners with technical repair and restoration issues as well as organizing tractor rallies and social gatherings that help ensure these historic machines stay alive.

Old Porsche Tractors: How Safe Are They?

Old Porsche Tractors: How Safe Are They?

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